CLEAR THE WAY! Irish-American Civil War Ghosts

Clear the Way by Don Troiani

“Faugh a Ballagh” the Irish Brigade’s War Cry means “clear the way,” the title of this painting by Don Troiani. The dead still chant it on the battlefield to this day.

 

In Ghosts and Haunts of the Civil War, among other battlefield ghosts I chronicled the better-known haunts of Antietam Battlefield.  Foremost among these was the tale—true as far as I know—of the ghosts of the famed Irish Brigade who still inhabit the bloody fields of Antietam.

In researching Ghosts and Haunts of the Civil War, as with my other collections of true ghost stories, I used various sources, including recruiting, where possible, the help of local park rangers, re-enactors and battlefield guides.  After all, they are the ones most familiar with the terrain and local folklore and, as they are often present on the battlefields after the public leaves for the day, they generally have had more paranormal encounters than the average visitor. At Antietam I was fortunate to have one of the more co-operative park rangers, and while he could not go on the record, he told me about several authentic encounters that visitors had had there.

There is a boy’s school in nearby Baltimore that every year has a field trip to Antietam. They make the rounds of the various spots connected with the battle, ending up at the infamous Bloody Lane, where the blue-coated boys rested before getting back on the school bus back to home.  The teacher, well versed in Civil War history, generally has the boys compose an essay on what they experienced on the bus ride back home.  One year, their responses were very curious.

The teacher read in the essays accounts of hearing “Christmas Carols” being sung while they were sitting in the Sunken Road.  Asking the students, who had not had a chance to talk to one another before writing their papers, he found that the sound they heard seemed to be like “fa-la-la-lah.” The teacher immediately understood that what they’d heard: the Irish war cry, “Faugh a Ballagh!” In English it means “Clear the Way!” It was the very same war cry the famed Irish Brigade had yelled as the charged through the cornfields to their death at the Bloody Lane in the Autumn of 1862.

No one saw the phantom soldiers on that flat field, to be sure; but how did the school boys, who knew precious little about the war, or the Irish Brigade, come up with the same descriptions of the sounds they heard in the quiet twilight at the Bloody Lane?  It, like many other mysteries connected with the Civil War, shall remain unexplained forever.

GHOSTS AND HAUNTS OF THE CIVIL WAR 3x5    

For more about Antietam’s ghosts, as well as many other paranormal experiences tied to the Late Unpleasantness, go to Ghosts and Haunts of the Civil War to learn more.

Official Reports of the Irish Brigade at Antietam: http://www.history.army.mil/html/topics/ethnic/irish/antietam.html

ambrose-bierce-and-the-period-of-honorable-strife-cover

Ambrose Bierce, famed American author, is best known for his macabre fiction and cynical humor served in the front lines during the Civil War.  His wartime experiences were transformative; Ambrose Bierce and the Period of Honorable Strife for the first time chronicles this pivotal period in Bierce’s life .  

 

 

 

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About Christopher Coleman

I am an author, lecturer, and sometime instructor. My interests span a variety of subjects, including Southern tales of the supernatural, American history and folklore, military history in general, as well as archaeology, anthropology, plus various and sundry things that go bump in the night. I currently have six books in print: Strange Tales of the Dark and Bloody Ground, Ghosts and Haunts of the Civil War, Dixie Spirits, Ghosts and Haunts of Tennessee and The Paranormal Presidency of Abraham Lincoln, a factual history of some more esoteric--and hitherto overlooked--aspects the sixteenth President. My book is Ambrose Bierce and the Period of Honorable Strife, published in hardcover by the University of Tennessee Press and chronicling the wartime experiences of young Ambrose Bierce, noted American author. Bierce has been called many things by many people, but idealist, hero and patriot are terms that should be added to the list after reading this book. I am currently at work on several projects, some dealing with the American experience but also several fiction and non-fiction works looking into the Age of Arthur.
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One Response to CLEAR THE WAY! Irish-American Civil War Ghosts

  1. Enjoyed it very much! Shared on Twitter and fb (several places). Glad to have you in our Civil War Bloggers, Authors, & Photographers Network!

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